October 18, 2021

President of Tripwire praises Texas new abortion law causing studio to cut ties – Daily Mail

The president of video game publisher Tripwire Interactive has tweeted his support for Texas’ controversial new ‘heartbeat’ law that effectively bans abortions after six weeks – causing a co-developer studio to immediately cancel their contracts. 

Texas’ SB-8, also known as the Texas Heartbeat Act, is the strictest abortion law in the country, and bans women from having abortions once a fetal heartbeat can be detected, which is usually around six weeks – before many women become aware of their pregnancy. 

John Gibson, the head of Portland-based Tripwire Interactive, posted the tweet on Saturday. His company is best known for creating the popular survival game Maneater as well as the multiplayer hit Chivalry 2.

Gibson wrote that he was ‘proud’ of the high court, writing: ‘As an entertainer I don’t get political often. Yet with so many vocal peers on the other side of this issue, I felt it was important to go on the record as a pro-life game developer.’ 

Portland city council is preparing to vote on an emergency resolution this week which will restrict goods, services and official travel to Texas in protest at the law.  

John Gibson, the head of Georgia-based Tripwire Interactive, tweeted his support for the Supreme Court’s decision not to block a controversial ‘heartbeat’ law in Texas that effectively bans abortions

John Gibson, the head of Georgia-based Tripwire Interactive, tweeted his support for the Supreme Court’s decision not to block a controversial ‘heartbeat’ law in Texas that effectively bans abortions

John Gibson, the head of Georgia-based Tripwire Interactive, tweeted his support for the Supreme Court’s decision not to block a controversial ‘heartbeat’ law in Texas that effectively bans abortions

Gibson wrote that he was ‘proud’ of the high court, writing: ‘As an entertainer I don’t get political often. Yet with so many vocal peers on the other side of this issue, I felt it was important to go on the record as a pro-life game developer.’

Gibson wrote that he was ‘proud’ of the high court, writing: ‘As an entertainer I don’t get political often. Yet with so many vocal peers on the other side of this issue, I felt it was important to go on the record as a pro-life game developer.’

Gibson wrote that he was ‘proud’ of the high court, writing: ‘As an entertainer I don’t get political often. Yet with so many vocal peers on the other side of this issue, I felt it was important to go on the record as a pro-life game developer.’

His company is best known for creating the popular survival game Maneater as well as the multiplayer hit Chivalry 2

His company is best known for creating the popular survival game Maneater as well as the multiplayer hit Chivalry 2

His company is best known for creating the popular survival game Maneater as well as the multiplayer hit Chivalry 2

Texas Governor Greg Abbott is seen above on March 25. His state has been criticized for passing a restrictive new abortion law

Texas Governor Greg Abbott is seen above on March 25. His state has been criticized for passing a restrictive new abortion law

Texas Governor Greg Abbott is seen above on March 25. His state has been criticized for passing a restrictive new abortion law

Women protest against the six-week abortion ban at the Capitol in Austin on Wednesday

Women protest against the six-week abortion ban at the Capitol in Austin on Wednesday

Women protest against the six-week abortion ban at the Capitol in Austin on Wednesday

In response to Gibson’s post, Shipwright Studios, a developer that collaborated with Tripwire on its Maneater and Chivalry 2 projects, announced that it was cutting ties with Tripwire.

‘While your politics are your own, the moment you make them a matter of public discourse you entangle all of those working for and with you,’ the company wrote in a statement posted to Twitter.

‘We know it is difficult for employees to speak up or act out in these scenarios, and they may not feel comfortable to speak their minds.

‘It is regrettable, but we feel it would be doing ourselves, your employees, your partners and the industry as a whole a disservice to allow this pattern to continue without comment.

‘We started Shipwright with the idea that it was finally time to put our money where our mouth is.

‘We cannot in good conscience continue to work with Tripwire under the current leadership structure.’

Torn Banner Studios, another developer that had a hand in building Chivalry 2, posted a tweet distancing itself from Tripwire.

‘We do not share the opinion expressed in a recent tweet by the president of Tripwire, publisher of Chivalry 2,’ the firm said in a statement.

‘This perspective is not shared by our team, nor is it reflected in the games we create. The statement stands in opposition to what we believe about women’s rights.’

In response to Gibson’s post, Shipwright Studios, a developer that collaborated with Tripwire on its Maneater and Chivalry 2 projects, announced that it was cutting ties with Tripwire

In response to Gibson’s post, Shipwright Studios, a developer that collaborated with Tripwire on its Maneater and Chivalry 2 projects, announced that it was cutting ties with Tripwire

In response to Gibson’s post, Shipwright Studios, a developer that collaborated with Tripwire on its Maneater and Chivalry 2 projects, announced that it was cutting ties with Tripwire

Torn Banner Studios, another developer that had a hand in building Chivalry 2, posted a tweet distancing itself from Tripwire

Torn Banner Studios, another developer that had a hand in building Chivalry 2, posted a tweet distancing itself from Tripwire

Torn Banner Studios, another developer that had a hand in building Chivalry 2, posted a tweet distancing itself from Tripwire

Torn Banner and Shipwright both helped Tripwire develop its popular game Chivalry 2

Torn Banner and Shipwright both helped Tripwire develop its popular game Chivalry 2

Torn Banner and Shipwright both helped Tripwire develop its popular game Chivalry 2

The law’s going into effect has outraged abortion rights activists and their supporters, prompting calls for boycotts of blue-chip companies that have expanded their operations in the Lone Star State in recent years. 

Hollywood actors, musicians and celebrities hit out Thursday at the new law.

Reese Witherspoon, Eva Longoria Baston and Pink were among those criticizing the ‘fetal heartbeat’ bill.

‘It’s pretty simple. We should all be able to make decisions about our health & future,’ tweeted Desperate Housewives star Longoria Baston.

‘But between (Texas’s) extreme abortion ban & states passing a record number of abortion restrictions this year, we have to fight for everyone’s reproductive freedom.’

Under the hashtag #BansOffOurBodies, actress and producer Reese Witherspoon tweeted: ‘I stand with the women of Texas who have the Constitutional right to make decisions about their health and their own bodies.’

There are growing calls for companies to pull out of SXSW, the annual music, film, and politics festival in Austin, Texas

There are growing calls for companies to pull out of SXSW, the annual music, film, and politics festival in Austin, Texas

There are growing calls for companies to pull out of SXSW, the annual music, film, and politics festival in Austin, Texas 

Singer Pink said: ‘I stand in solidarity with people in (Texas) who, as of today, face an extreme 6-week abortion ban.

‘This ban… will be the blueprint for bans across the US. Unless we do something about it.’

The celebrity reactions were among a flood of responses after the United States Supreme Court declined to block the bill at the eleventh hour.

The Texas law makes no exceptions for rape or incest. The only exception is if there is a danger to the woman’s health.

While similar laws have passed in a dozen Republican-led conservative states, all had been stymied in the courts.

Pro-choice advocates say the refusal of the Supreme Court to step in to block the bill imperils rights that have been enshrined in US law since a landmark 1973 case.

‘The Supreme Court’s ruling overnight is an unprecedented assault on a woman’s constitutional rights under Roe v. Wade, which has been the law of the land for almost fifty years,’ President Joe Biden said in a statement.

Lyft and Uber have vowed to cover 100 percent of their drivers' legal fees if they get sued for transporting women to abortion appointments in Texas

Lyft and Uber have vowed to cover 100 percent of their drivers' legal fees if they get sued for transporting women to abortion appointments in Texas

Lyft and Uber have vowed to cover 100 percent of their drivers' legal fees if they get sued for transporting women to abortion appointments in Texas

Lyft and Uber have vowed to cover 100 percent of their drivers' legal fees if they get sued for transporting women to abortion appointments in Texas

Lyft and Uber have vowed to cover 100 percent of their drivers’ legal fees if they get sued for transporting women to abortion appointments in Texas

The law in Republican-dominated Texas is particularly controversial because it allows members of the public to sue doctors who perform abortions, with medics liable for up to $10,000 for each procedure they perform.

Abortion is a touchstone issue in the United States, provoking strong responses on both sides.

The Texas law is among a raft of state-level measures coming to the fore as Republican-dominated legislatures seek to make rules that polls say a majority of Americans disagree with.

The appointment to the Supreme Court of three judges by former president Donald Trump has emboldened those on the right – particularly evangelical Christians – who see a chance to reverse a ruling they hold as counter to the will of God.

The new law has prompted calls for film companies to boycott the state. 

Actress Patricia Arquette tweeted: ‘We will not stop until women have full equal rights in every state in America. We will boycott you. We will out organize you. We will strike you.’

The company vowed in a statement to 'keep fighting against regressive laws like SB8'

The company vowed in a statement to 'keep fighting against regressive laws like SB8'

The company vowed in a statement to ‘keep fighting against regressive laws like SB8’

Bumble, meanwhile, announced it will donate to women's reproductive rights organizations. Pictured CEO and founder Whitney Wolfe

Bumble, meanwhile, announced it will donate to women's reproductive rights organizations. Pictured CEO and founder Whitney Wolfe

Shar Dubey (pictured), CEO of Match Group, said she is personally setting up a fund to support employees and their dependents who may need to travel out of Texas for an abortion

Shar Dubey (pictured), CEO of Match Group, said she is personally setting up a fund to support employees and their dependents who may need to travel out of Texas for an abortion

Shar Dubey (right), CEO of Match Group, said she is personally setting up a fund to support employees and their dependents who may need to travel out of Texas for an abortion. Bumble, meanwhile, announced it will donate to women’s reproductive rights organizations. Pictured CEO and founder Whitney Wolfe (left) 

Match Group owns Tinder, OkCupid, Hinge and PlentyOfFish and has around 400 employees in Texas

Match Group owns Tinder, OkCupid, Hinge and PlentyOfFish and has around 400 employees in Texas

Match Group owns Tinder, OkCupid, Hinge and PlentyOfFish and has around 400 employees in Texas

Her sister, Rosanna Arquette, tweeted: ‘I’ve just turned down a film I love cause it shoots in Texas.’

Author Megan Kelley Hall tweeted: ‘Every recording artist or entertainer, every athlete, every comedian, should cancel their tour dates in Texas.

‘Today. Right now. Don’t wait another second.

‘Don’t bring money & business to a state that has put $10k bounties on women’s heads.’

Actor Billy Baldwin tweeted: ‘Let me get this straight: No masks. No vaccinations. Voter suppression. Women’s rights violated. Abortion bounty hunters. Open carry assault weapons.

‘Make no mistake… #BoycottTexas will cost them billions in lost business and a 100 thousand jobs.’

In 2019, several prominent voices in Hollywood urged a boycott of Georgia after that state’s Republican-dominated legislature passed a ‘fetal heartbeat’ measure that effectively banned abortions.

Last year, a federal judge blocked the measure, saying it was unconstitutional. 

Georgia has become known as the ‘Hollywood of the South’ due to its 30 percent tax rebate for film and TV production – and has grown that reputation into a $9.5billion industry.

The state brings in approximately $2.7billion each year in direct revenue from filming.

The Walking Dead makes up no small part of that.

‘I stand with the women of Texas who have the Constitutional right to make decisions about their health and their own bodies,’ actress Reese Witherspoon told her nearly 3 million followers.

‘I stand with the women of Texas who have the Constitutional right to make decisions about their health and their own bodies,’ actress Reese Witherspoon told her nearly 3 million followers.

‘I stand with the women of Texas who have the Constitutional right to make decisions about their health and their own bodies,’ actress Reese Witherspoon told her nearly 3 million followers.

‘I stand in solidarity with people in (Texas) who, as of today, face an extreme 6-week abortion ban,’ tweeted singer P!nk. ‘This ban... will be the blueprint for bans across the US. Unless we do something about it.’

‘I stand in solidarity with people in (Texas) who, as of today, face an extreme 6-week abortion ban,’ tweeted singer P!nk. ‘This ban... will be the blueprint for bans across the US. Unless we do something about it.’

‘It’s pretty simple,' actress Eva Longoria Baston tweeted to her 6.8 million followers. 'We should all be able to make decisions about our health and future. ‘But between Texas’s extreme abortion ban and states passing a record number of abortion restrictions this year, we have to fight for everyone’s reproductive freedom.’

‘It’s pretty simple,' actress Eva Longoria Baston tweeted to her 6.8 million followers. 'We should all be able to make decisions about our health and future. ‘But between Texas’s extreme abortion ban and states passing a record number of abortion restrictions this year, we have to fight for everyone’s reproductive freedom.’

Pink (left) and actress Eva Longoria Baston (right) have also spoken up against the new law 

Actress Patricia Arquette tweeted: 'We will not stop until women have full equal rights in every state in America. We will boycott you. We will out organize you. We will strike you.'

Actress Patricia Arquette tweeted: 'We will not stop until women have full equal rights in every state in America. We will boycott you. We will out organize you. We will strike you.'

Actress Patricia Arquette tweeted: ‘We will not stop until women have full equal rights in every state in America. We will boycott you. We will out organize you. We will strike you.’

Her sister, Rosanna Arquette, tweeted: 'I've just turned down a film I love cause it shoots in Texas.'

Her sister, Rosanna Arquette, tweeted: 'I've just turned down a film I love cause it shoots in Texas.'

Her sister, Rosanna Arquette, tweeted: ‘I’ve just turned down a film I love cause it shoots in Texas.’

Actor Billy Baldwin tweeted: 'Let me get this straight: No masks. No vaccinations. Voter suppression. Women’s rights violated. Abortion bounty hunters. Open carry assault weapons. Make no mistake… #BoycottTexas will cost them billions in lost business and a 100 thousand jobs.'

Actor Billy Baldwin tweeted: 'Let me get this straight: No masks. No vaccinations. Voter suppression. Women’s rights violated. Abortion bounty hunters. Open carry assault weapons. Make no mistake… #BoycottTexas will cost them billions in lost business and a 100 thousand jobs.'

Actor Billy Baldwin tweeted: ‘Let me get this straight: No masks. No vaccinations. Voter suppression. Women’s rights violated. Abortion bounty hunters. Open carry assault weapons. Make no mistake… #BoycottTexas will cost them billions in lost business and a 100 thousand jobs.’

Author Megan Kelley Hall tweeted: 'Every recording artist or entertainer, every athlete, every comedian, should cancel their tour dates in Texas. Today. Right now. Don’t wait another second. Don’t bring money & business to a state that has put $10k bounties on women's heads.'

Author Megan Kelley Hall tweeted: 'Every recording artist or entertainer, every athlete, every comedian, should cancel their tour dates in Texas. Today. Right now. Don’t wait another second. Don’t bring money & business to a state that has put $10k bounties on women's heads.'

Author Megan Kelley Hall tweeted: ‘Every recording artist or entertainer, every athlete, every comedian, should cancel their tour dates in Texas. Today. Right now. Don’t wait another second. Don’t bring money & business to a state that has put $10k bounties on women’s heads.’

Production in the state also supports 92,100 jobs and pays those workers close to $4.6billion in total annual wages.

Netflix was the first major Hollywood player to speak out against the Georgia law.

Soon after, Disney and WarnerMedia, the parent company of HBO and Warner Bros., shared similar doubt about their future in the state if the law makes it to January and is eventually enforced.

Disney CEO Bob Iger said it would be ‘very difficult’ to film in Georgia if the law goes into effect.

DailyMail.com has reached out to Netflix, Coca-Cola, and SXSW seeking comment. 

Portland city council is preparing to vote on an emergency resolution this week which will restrict goods, services and official travel to Texas in protest at the state’s the new abortion law. 

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler says the City Council will hold a vote on the resolution on Wednesday, with the intent to ban Portland’s ‘future procurement of goods and services from, and City employee business travel to, the state of Texas.’ 

Wheeler said that the City Council ‘stands unified in its belief that all people should have the right to choose if and when they carry a pregnancy.’

‘The ban will be in effect until the state of Texas withdraws its unconstitutional ban on abortion or until it is overturned in court. City legal counsel is currently evaluating the legal aspects of this proposed resolution,’ Wheeler added.

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler (pictured) says the City Council will hold a vote on the resolution on Wednesday, with the intent to ban Portland's 'future procurement of goods and services from, and City employee business travel to, the state of Texas.'

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler (pictured) says the City Council will hold a vote on the resolution on Wednesday, with the intent to ban Portland's 'future procurement of goods and services from, and City employee business travel to, the state of Texas.'

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler (pictured) says the City Council will hold a vote on the resolution on Wednesday, with the intent to ban Portland’s ‘future procurement of goods and services from, and City employee business travel to, the state of Texas.’

So far, prominent companies based in Texas have declined to weigh in on the law.

American Airlines, Dell Technologies, Southwest Airlines, and Hewlett-Packard Enterprise all declined to comment.

Hewlett-Packard moved its headquarters from Silicon Valley to Texas last year.

Other companies who have large workforces in Texas, including Amazon, Apple, Google, Kimberly Clark, and AT&T, also have been silent.

In recent months, companies have been willing to speak up on critical social and political issues.

Earlier this year, several Atlanta-based companies including Delta Air Lines and Coca-Cola criticized a new voting law enacted by Georgia’s GOP-led legislature. 

Major League Baseball moved the All-Star Game from Atlanta to Denver, Colorado in response to the new legislation. 

Meanwhile, Elon Musk has declined to comment on Texas ‘ restrictive new abortion law after Governor Greg Abbott said that the tech mogul supported the state’s ‘social policies.’

Elon Musk declined to comment on Texas' restrictive abortion law on Thursday but hinted at his opposition of the heartbeat bill

Elon Musk declined to comment on Texas' restrictive abortion law on Thursday but hinted at his opposition of the heartbeat bill

Elon Musk declined to comment on Texas’ restrictive abortion law on Thursday but hinted at his opposition of the heartbeat bill

Musk tweeted after Gov. Greg Abbott claimed that the billionaire approved of the state's social policies. Musk moved to Texas from California last year

Musk tweeted after Gov. Greg Abbott claimed that the billionaire approved of the state's social policies. Musk moved to Texas from California last year

Musk tweeted after Gov. Greg Abbott claimed that the billionaire approved of the state’s social policies. Musk moved to Texas from California last year 

Gov. Abbott said 'Elon consistently tells me that he likes the social policies in the state of Texas' when insisting that Texas' conservative social politics will drive business to the state

Gov. Abbott said 'Elon consistently tells me that he likes the social policies in the state of Texas' when insisting that Texas' conservative social politics will drive business to the state

Gov. Abbott said ‘Elon consistently tells me that he likes the social policies in the state of Texas’ when insisting that Texas’ conservative social politics will drive business to the state

On Thursday, Abbott appeared on CNBC and insisted that companies would not quit the state over the controversial new law – which bans abortions once a heart beat can be detected, typically around six weeks.

He said: ‘Elon had to get out of California because in part of the social policies in California. Elon consistently tells me that he likes the social policies in the state of Texas.’

The Tesla and SpaceX CEO – who moved from California to Texas last year – later tweeted a response to a clip of the interview, but stopped short of commenting directly on the law.

Musk wrote: ‘In general, I believe government should rarely impose its will upon the people, and, when doing so, should aspire to maximize their cumulative happiness.

‘That said, I would prefer to stay out of politics.’ 

Other firms, however, have been more pro-active.

Lyft and Uber have vowed to cover 100 percent of their drivers’ legal fees if they get sued for transporting women to abortion appointments in Texas.

The ride-sharing giants both announced the creation of legal funds Friday with Lyft’s CEO Logan Green saying the new law ‘threatens to punish drivers for getting people where they need to go – especially women exercising their right to choose.’

Lyft was first to push back against the law Friday, with the company releasing a statement vowing to defend both its drivers and riders. 

Texas-based dating app companies Match and Bumble have launched funds to help women seeking abortions after the state implemented America’s most extreme reproductive rights law. 

Shar Dubey, CEO of Match Group which owns Tinder, OkCupid, Hinge and PlentyOfFish, said she is personally setting up a fund to support employees and their dependents who may need to travel out of state for an abortion. 

Bumble, meanwhile, announced it will donate to women’s reproductive rights organizations as the company vowed to ‘keep fighting against regressive laws.’        

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *